The Boeing 747-400 is a major development and the best-selling model of the Boeing 747 family of jet airliners. While retaining the four-engine wide-body layout of its predecessors, the 747-400 embodies numerous technological and structural changes to produce a more efficient airframe. Its most distinguishing features versus preceding 747 models are 6-foot (1.8 m) winglets mounted on 6-foot (1.8 m) wing tip extensions, which are found on all 747-400s except for Japanese domestic market versions.
The 747-400 is equipped with a two-crew glass cockpit, which dispenses with the need for a flight engineer, along with more fuel-efficient engines, an optional fuel tank in the horizontal stabilizer, and revised fuselage/wing fairings. The aircraft also features an all-new interior with upgraded in-flight entertainment architecture. As on the 747-300, passenger variants include a stretched upper deck as standard. The model has a maximum capacity of 660 passengers with the 747-400D variant, and can fly non-stop for up to 7,670 nautical miles (14,200 km) with maximum payload, depending on model.
Northwest Airlines first placed the 747-400 in commercial service in February 9, 1989. The 747-400 was produced in passenger (−400), freighter (−400F), combi (−400M), domestic (−400D), extended range passenger (−400ER) and extended range freighter (−400ERF) versions. The last 747−400, a -400ERF, was delivered in 2009. The 747-400 is the second-most recent version of the Boeing 747 family, having been superseded by the improved Boeing 747-8.

Thrust reversal, also called reverse thrust, is the temporary diversion of an aircraft engine’s exhaust so that it is directed forward, rather than backwards. Reverse thrust acts against the forward travel of the aircraft, providing deceleration. Thrust reverser systems are featured on many jet aircraft to help slow down just after touch-down, reducing wear on the brakes and enabling shorter landing distances. Such devices affect the aircraft significantly and are considered important for safe operations by airlines. There have been accidents involving thrust reversal systems.
Reverse thrust is also available on many propeller-driven aircraft through reversing the controllable-pitch propellers to a negative angle. The equivalent concept for a ship is called astern propulsion.

EVA Airways Corporation (pronounced “E-V-A Airways”) is a Taiwanese international airline based at Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport near Taipei, Taiwan, operating passenger and dedicated cargo services to over 40 international destinations in Asia, Australia, Europe, and North America. EVA Air is largely privately owned and flies a fully international route network. It is the second largest Taiwanese airline. EVA Air is headquartered in Luzhu, Taoyuan City, Taiwan.
Since its founding in 1989 as an affiliate of shipping conglomerate Evergreen Group, EVA Air has expanded to include air cargo, airline catering, ground handling, and aviation engineering services. Its cargo arm, EVA Air Cargo, links with the Evergreen worldwide shipping network on sea and land. Its domestic and regional subsidiary, UNI Air, operates a medium and short-haul network to destinations in Taiwan, Macau and China with its main hub in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. As of January 2015, EVA Air is the 3rd safest airline in the world, with no hull losses, accidents, or fatalities since its establishment.
EVA Air operates a mixed fleet of Airbus and Boeing aircraft, with Airbus A330, Boeing 747, Airbus A321, and Boeing 777 airliners primarily used on passenger routes, along with Boeing 747 freighters used on cargo routes. The airline was one of the first carriers to introduce the Premium Economy class (called Elite class in EVA Air), which it debuted in 1991. Elite class is onboard Boeing 777 and selected Boeing 747 aircraft.

40 COMMENTS

  1. I love EVA air but that damn cabin music at the end of a transpacific flight is the worst!
    Sad to read they're retiring their 747s from most if not all of them from US routes.

  2. Love the sound of all that GE muscle. On the rails as a heavy diesel locomotive or under the wings of a mighty jetliner its GE all the way. Both engines sound beastly in full reverse thrust (planes) or in full dynamic breaking (Trains).

  3. Please could anyone explain to me what is happening, how and why? For example.
    I found this video to be very interesting, but have no knowledge so basics please:D
    Also is a reverse-thrust necessary? Do all airplanes have this capability?

  4. These aircraft are used to blow dry the runway for the next aircraft in line for takeoff. Very ingenious indeed.

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