Update 2 reflecting no initial post-impact fire.

This is a very accurate reconstruction of the crash of Asiana flight 214 at San Francisco Airport on July 6, 2013 with the exception of the post impact fire. It is now reported that the fire did not break out until 90 seconds after the aircraft came to rest. That adjustment will be made and re-posted this evening.

All times, speeds, distances and scaling contained are accurate to the data available as of July 10, 2013. There is also included in the segment a blue transparent exemplar aircraft programmed to follow the correct 3 degree glide slope to the intended touchdown point 1,000 ft down the marked runway. This is the path and altitude the Asiana flight should have been flying during the approach. Please note that the blue exemplar aircraft is not programmed to fly at the correct approach speed, only the correct altitude. If it were programmed to fly the correct approach speed it would very quickly pass the Asiana aircraft and disappear off screen. The reconstruction also contains the actual SFO tower communications with flight 214 although the actual timing of the communications may not be absolutely synchronized to the animation since the data necessary to precisely synch won’t be available until it is released by the FAA or NTSB in the coming weeks.

This reconstruction will continue to be further refined and re-posted as new data becomes available.

30 COMMENTS

  1. this could have been avoided you knw this is basic pilot error he came to close to the seawall.. losing the life of that poor student

  2. In FLCH (flight level change) mode, the autothrottles goes into their last setting which was IDLE & WON'T move. 
    Here the pilots were TOO PRE-OCCUPIED with their glideslope profile that they let their airspeed DECAY and thought that the autothrottles would auto advance to take care of the airspeed.
    Forgetting that HOLD FLCH is NOT AN APPROACH mode!!

  3. Amazing video, congratulations ! Even a computer simulator geek can tell it´s too low and slow, way way off ! Can´t blame it on the tower, flash light. They turned off the autothrottle, even so, they shoud be aware visually of what´s was going on.

  4. Too many pilots don't really know how to fly, many pilots are nothing more than computer managers with no stick and rudder skill. Too many planes and lives are lost when the aircraft computers or ground systems stop working and the pilots must actually FLY the plane. Nice animation, I like the display of the correct glide slope.

  5. I AM CURIOUS HOW THE PILOT CONTINGENT ALL COULD MISS THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE  GLIDE SLOPE OUT IN THIS APPROACH.  THE AUTO APPROACH AND LAND SYSTEMS SEEM TO HAVE PERFORMED AS THEY WERE DESIGNED TO DO.

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